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The Lowdown on the Litterbox

Posted by at 12:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (5)


litter-box

Kramdar / CC by 2.0

Cats make great companions for many reasons, one of which is that they come with their own pre-trained method for waste disposal. Simply show new cats the litterbox, and generally, they’ll be good to go. Felines are naturally (and understandably) very picky about their hygiene, so here are three litterbox “do’s and don’ts” to help you keep your kitties happy:

1. Give your kitty some privacy!
Most cats like to do their business alone, so be sure to put your cat’s litterbox in a “low traffic” area of your home. This area should be clean and quiet and make your cats feel “safe” in order to avoid accidents. Also, there should be one litterbox per cat in each household.

2. Scoop, clean, and replace often.
Cats are very clean animals, and they don’t like using a dirty litterbox. Would you? Ideally, one should scoop the litter pan twice a day. Be sure to replace all the litter in the box monthly and also scrub the empty box with a mild soap. Replace litterboxes once a year, as plastic can retain odors.

3. Before you scold your cat for going outside the litterbox …
Ask yourself if this is the result of something else. Is the litterbox clean? Have you recently changed your brand of litter? Or could your cat be sick and trying to tell you something? Consult your veterinarian for advice immediately if your cat has diarrhea or is having “accidents” outside the litterbox.

Remember that not every litterbox—and not every litter—will work for every cat. As I’m sure you know, cats are individuals who have their own tastes, preferences, and personalities. Of course, this is what makes them so wonderful, but at times, their stubbornness can be both adorable and annoying at the same time! How do they do that?!

Above all, be patient with your cats. They depend on you, and while you may be busy or have other places to be or people to see, they have only you. Give them the love and care that they not only need but also deserve.

This post originally appeared on PETA.org.

Image: Kramdar / CC by 2.0

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5 Comments

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    Tucker says...

    May 27th, 2011, 5:52 pm

    AMEN !!

    Romani says...

    May 27th, 2011, 9:25 pm

    ABSOLUTELY ! WOULD WE WANT LESS FOR OURSELVES?

    Natasha K. says...

    May 27th, 2011, 9:29 pm

    Although I agree with most of the points here, I would have to say that it’s a little unfeasible to scoop the box twice a day. My husband and I have two cats, an 18 month old and we both work full time. Remembering (or even having time) to change the box once a day has proven to be quite difficult, let alone having to do it more than that. We do aim to do it at least once because we do have two cats, and only one litter box (having more than one is not ideal in our current living conditions). Our cats are brother and sister, so they don’t mind sharing things. They get along very well.

    Peg Haust-Arliss says...

    May 28th, 2011, 5:56 pm

    Has anyone here had any experience with toilet training? No mess and no toxins! Peta approved method???

    Ann says...

    May 30th, 2011, 12:05 am

    Thanks for this article! I never thought about getting new litterboxes every year – but from now on I will. These articles are great!

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