Home & Garden

  • Aug
  • 31

His Name Is Earl

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His Name Is Earl by Guest Blogger

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Earl, a category 4 hurricane, could be pounding on East Coast residents’ doors within days. For those of us who live in areas prone to hurricanes (or wildfires, earthquakes, tornadoes, blizzards, or any other type of disaster) it’s crucial to make emergency plans for our animal companions now, before disaster strikes. Here are some tips:

  • Always take animals along in evacuations. Downed power lines and impassable roads may make it impossible to return home for weeks, leaving animals stranded without food or water.
  • Make a list of places that will accept you and your animals during an evacuation. Friends, family, and hotels are good options.
  • Ensure that all animals are up to date on vaccinations and are wearing collars with identification tags.
  • Assemble an emergency kit, including leashes, bowls, towels, blankets, litter, litter pans, and at least a week’s supply of food and medications.
  • Leave animals behind only as the last resort. Leave them indoors, with access to upper floors and at least 10 days’ worth of dry food and water (fill sinks and multiple containers). Place signs in windows and on the front door indicating the number and type of animals inside-rescue teams may be able to save them.

Done all this? Great! You can help even more animals by donating to PETA’s Animal Emergency Fund!

This post was originally published on The PETA Files.

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The information and views provided here are intended for informational and preliminary educational purposes only. From time to time, content may be posted on the site regarding various financial planning and human and animal health issues. Such content is never intended to be and should never be taken as a substitute for the advice of readers' own financial planners, veterinarians, or other licensed professionals. You should not use any information contained on this site to diagnose yourself or your companion animals' health or fitness. Readers in need of applicable professional advice are strongly encouraged to seek it. Except where third-party ownership or copyright is indicated or credited regarding materials contained in this blog, reproduction or redistribution of any of the content for personal, noncommercial use is enthusiastically encouraged.