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Prime Victory! Robert ‘Retired’ From Experiments at University of Utah

Posted by at 5:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (7)


Prime Victory! Robert 'Retired' From Experiments at University of Utah by Guest BloggerEarlier this week, PETA called on caring people to urge the University of Utah to retire Robert, a sweet tabby purchased by the school for $15 from the Davis County animal shelter and used in a cruel experiment in which his skull was cut open and electrodes were implanted.

PETA has just received confirmation from university officials that Robert will be retired from the laboratory and adopted into a new home. Hip, hip, hooray!

While we pause to celebrate Robert’s release, we cannot forget that other homeless cats and dogs purchased from animal shelters are still languishing in the University of Utah’s laboratories.

Please speak out in their behalf by contacting the school again. Demand an end to its cruel betrayal of dogs and cats in shelters by telling the school to stop purchasing homeless animals for painful-and often lethal-experiments. Let’s work to protect other vulnerable animals like Robert from this awful fate, shall we?

This post by Karin Bennett was originally published on The PETA Files.

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    Laura says...

    December 16th, 2009, 9:38 am

    I think we need to contact their local animal shelters because they are the ones selling the animals! I managed an animal shelter for several years and we were all extremely aware that this might happen, and often refused adoption when we were suspicious. I realize you can’t be 100% sure, but you can be really cautious and follow up on adoptions……

    Warren says...

    December 18th, 2009, 2:43 pm

    I am skeptical of this. Is there any proof that Robert has been adopted into a home, or is this just a case of the University of Utah telling a lie, while Robert has either been euthanized or is still suffering behind their closed doors? Show us the proof. The University’s word means nothing without verifiable proof.

    Naila M. Sanchez says...

    December 18th, 2009, 4:23 pm

    If everyone would call their shelters or stop by in person and speak their mind regarding animal research we can make a difference… Even the people working there can be educated and work together to end these atrocities!!

    Heather says...

    December 19th, 2009, 9:03 am

    I agree with Laura! shame on those shelters they are supposed to be there to make sure that those animals go to a better home than the one they had before. It should be like adopting a child where there is a worker assigned to go out to the homes and check on them .

    Don says...

    December 19th, 2009, 8:20 pm

    Can someone tell me if the electrodes were removed? If so, did the removal harm him? And how was the hole in his skull closed up?

    Cheryl Johnson says...

    December 23rd, 2009, 9:27 pm

    Where are the answers to the above inquiries—was Robert really adopted? Injuries healed ,etc…show us a photo of Robert in his new home!

    Nori Kohlenberg says...

    February 25th, 2010, 8:52 pm

    I strongly agree with all the comments above.
    I really want to know if the cat is safe and without any pain .
    But this answer from U of U is very fishy to me,too.
    We need to see the proof of if the cat is OK and alive .

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